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02/07/2013

Copper River Salmon Wows Students in the Bronx

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club Cooking Program goes Wild for Salmon

Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club students learn about the benefits of wild Alaska Copper River Salmon during Marge Perry's cooking class.
Copper River Salmon Wows Students in the Bronx

Kips Bay students share their Copper River Salmon creations

Feb 07, 2013

For Immediate Release

February 7, 2013

Cordova, Alaska--Canned salmon isn’t generally listed on many children’s favorite foods list, but for twelve enthusiastic young students in the Bronx, cooking up salmon from Alaska’s Copper River opened their eyes and fueled their enthusiasm for this wild sustainable fish. Naturally rich in heart-healthy and brain boosting Omega-3 fatty acids, the convenient canned salmon wowed students and had them reaching for second helpings.

The Copper River Prince William Sound Marketing Association partnered with food writer and Newsday columnist Marge Perry to incorporate Copper River salmon into Perry’s cooking program at the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club in the Bronx. Ms. Perry had previously visited Cordova, Alaska and she wanted to share her experiences fishing for Copper River salmon with the class, which offers enriching afterschool activities for traditionally underserved children in the Bronx.

Without access to a pantry, kitchen, or even a stove, Ms. Perry built the program from scratch, incorporating clean and healthful foods that could impact the children in a positive way. After checking to make sure it was available at local grocery stores, wild Alaska salmon was at the top of her list and the Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association was happy to donate cans of skinless boneless Copper River salmon for the class. Executive Director Beth Poole said, “we were excited to share wild Alaska salmon with school children in New York. What better way to educate the next generation than to let them try it for themselves and share it with their families and friends? Each 3.5 oz. serving has more vitamin D than a glass a milk and loads of Omega-3 fatty acids for brain and heart health, making Copper River salmon a nutritional powerhouse. We love that canned salmon is a healthy protein that is convenient and can fit any income level.”

Focusing on simple and healthy preparations, the Kips Bay students learned how to make an easy salmon salad using basic ingredients and no added mayonnaise (recipe below). Serving the salmon in carved tomatoes and cucumbers made for a fun activity and elegant presentation and it turns out the Copper River salmon class was a favorite among students.

During class, students learned about the benefits of wild versus farmed salmon as well as sustainability and what it’s like to fish in Alaska. Each child also received a can of salmon and recipe ingredients to bring home to cook with their families.

This spring Perry is offering an advanced level Cooking Class for Kips Bay students, where they’ll tackle more challenging, but still healthy and fun, recipes—including ones using Copper River Salmon fillets. When asked how she’ll teach the children to prepare the salmon Perry replied, “I know I’m supposed to do something fancy, but the flavors of this salmon are so rich, we’re going to keep it simple with salt and pepper to let the students see that you don’t have to do much to great seafood to make it delicious.”

For additional information on the health benefits of Copper River salmon, check out the Association’s nutrition page here.

Marge’s Kips Bay Salmon Salad

This is the recipe that Ms. Perry taught in the Copper River salmon class, explaining that the wild Alaska salmon keeps the heart healthy and is called “brain food” because researchers believe it even helps the brain function. The students served this salmon salad in hollowed out tomatoes, but it can also be used in a sandwich or served on little breads or eaten as a snack over lettuce or crackers.

 

1 6-8-ounce canned salmon

1 celery stalk, chopped

1 scallion, green part chopped

½ red pepper, chopped

3 tablespoons lemon juice

 

1. Combine the salmon, celery, scallion, red pepper and lemon juice.

Makes 2 servings

Nutrition per serving: 198 calories, 30 g protein, 4 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 456 mg sodium

 

For more info contact: Beth Poole, Executive Director
Copper River/PWS Marketing Association
Box 199, Cordova, Alaska 99574
t: 907.424.3459:: f: 907.424-3430
www.copperriversalmon.org

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